Book Review: Kitty and the Midnight Hour by Carrie Vaughn

Kitty and the Midnight Hour by Carrie VaughnTitle: Kitty and the Midnight Hour
Author: Carrie Vaughn
Series: Kitty Norville, Book 1
Publisher: Grand Central Publishing
Paperback: 259 pages
Source: Chicago Public Library
Summary: (taken from Goodreads)

Kitty Norville is a midnight-shift DJ for a Denver radio station – and a werewolf in the closet. Her new late-night advice show for the supernaturally disadvantaged is a raging success, but it’s Kitty who can use some help. With one sexy werewolf-hunter and a few homicidal undead on her tail, Kitty may have bitten off more than she can chew?

Overall Rating: 4 out of 5

This has been on my to-read list for a WHILE, but there’s only so much paranormal romance I can read at once, so between Jeaniene Frost, Charlaine Harris, Patricia Briggs, and Kelley Armstrong, I’ve been pretty booked — so to speak. But, I’ve finally found the time to read this, and I am glad I did.

My favorite part is that the supernatural world is actually portrayed by Kitty as being weird. She doesn’t blindly accept werewolf rules and completely buy into the alpha/pack thing — it freaks her out and she’s constantly trying to reconcile what she knows as a human and how she feels as a wolf, which was interesting and unique, at least in terms of comparing to other paranormal books I’ve read. I also like that she starts off as the bottom of the pack and has that conflict between her human life and wolf life. Basically, Vaughn does a great job in contrasting Kitty’s wolf and human life and putting them in constant conflict. It makes for an engaging read.

I do think the “romance” between Kitty and the hunter was handled a little clumsily. I get that they need to have somewhat of an attraction for each other in order to move the story forward, but I think it was rather awkwardly fast, even with all of the drama going on. As a rule, I don’t particularly like how a lot of romance is done in books anyway, so I’m getting used to getting disappointed by strangely unrealistic portrayals of relationships.

Overall, this book surprised me quite a bit and I enjoyed the picture it painted of the supernatural world and how it interacts with the human world. In the future books, I’m hoping to see more consequences from Kitty openly admitting to being supernatural, and hopefully I get to see more of this world at work and how other packs/supernaturals interact with each other. We’ll see how quickly it’ll take me to get to book 2. :p

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Book Review: Magic Slays by Ilona Andrews

*WARNING: Spoilers for those who haven’t read books 1-4*
Author: Ilona Andrews
Publisher: Ace
Series: Kate Daniels, Book 5
Pages: 308
Summary: (taken from Goodreads)
For Challenge: 100 Books in a Year

Plagued by a war between magic and technology, Atlanta has never been so deadly. Good thing Kate Daniels is on the job.

Kate Daniels may have quit the Order of Merciful Aid, but she’s still knee-deep in paranormal problems. Or she would be if she could get someone to hire her. Starting her own business has been more challenging than she thought it would be—now that the Order is disparaging her good name, and many potential clients are afraid of getting on the bad side of the Beast Lord, who just happens to be Kate’s mate.

So when Atlanta’s premier Master of the Dead calls to ask for help with a vampire on the loose, Kate leaps at the chance of some paying work. Turns out this is not an isolated incident, and Kate needs to get to the bottom of it—fast, or the city and everyone dear to her might pay the ultimate price . .

Overall rating: 5/5

I always worry when a series goes longer than four books. In my experience, very few can go past that point and still keep the magic that made the first books so incredible. Characters lose their edge, relationships lose their spark, and the plot runs around in circles.

This series definitely doesn’t have any of those problems and can handle at least two more books, if not many, many more. Kate is as hilarious and kick-ass as ever. Curran is as possessive, adorable, and of course kick-ass as ever, and their relationship is certainly not losing any sparks. The plot is progressing nicely and I am SO excited for Book 6.

Book 4, Magic Bleeds, was a tipping point for this series. Kate’s secret about her parentage is being revealed to more and more people, and the danger for her is building up. I like that the confrontation between her and Roland doesn’t occur in Magic Slays, because the authors are really building up the pressure and suspense. The break from all the Roland stuff is nice, and we get a deeper look into the world Kate is living in and other dangers she has to face besides those from her father.

All the characters are showing amazing growth, and I’m still as fascinated by them as I was in the beginning of the series. Also, the writing is still edgy and spot-on. Despite all the crap she’s dealt with, Kate certainly has kept her sense of humor.

I only have one minor complaint, and it’s that this book was a little difficult to get into. There is a lot of build-up and background and we don’t get to the really good stuff until the last third of the book. But that last third certainly makes up for the beginning two-thirds.

I highly recommend this book to fans of this series, and for those of you who haven’t started reading these books yet, what are you waiting for?!

OTHER REVIEWS OF THIS BOOK:

Feeling Fictional